Recommended Components: 2019 Edition
Disc Players, Transports & Media Players

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Merging Technologies Merging+Player Multichannel-8: $13,500
Noting the enthusiasm shown by “normal” audiophiles for proprietary music players that can be controlled by a tablet or smartphone, KR hailed the appearance of the surround-sound–friendly Merging+Player Multichannel-8 from the Swiss firm Merging Technologies, whose Merging+NADAC D/A converter so impressed him (see elsewhere in Recommended Components). Indeed, the Merging+Player is essentially that very DAC plus a player in the same box, said box now enhanced with a pair of USB inputs. The user is required to supply little more than speakers, amplifiers, and a subscription to Roon, which serves the Merging+Player as user interface. The Merging+Player can handle PCM up to 24/352.8 and DSD64, and has the processing power to do so with or without EQ—although KR mused that it could benefit from more horsepower, “if only to improve the user experience.” Still, KR found the standalone Merging+Player to sound no different from his reference Roon-equipped Baetis server—high praise. He described it as “a one-box system of the highest quality.” (Vol.41 No.3 WWW)

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ATC CDA2 Mk2 CD player: $4249
An unexpected gem in the product line of a UK speaker specialist, the CDA2 Mk2 majors in the playing of “Red Book” CDs and minors in preamplification. As KM noted, “the beating heart of the revised CDA2 is twofold: a Chinese-made TEAC 5020A-AT CD transport . . . and [AKM’s] AK4490EQ DAC chip.” Preamp gain comes courtesy of op-amps built around discrete devices, and the USB receiver is an Amanero Combo 384. When using it to play CDs, KM found that “the ATC presented each as a character study of a unique sonic personality telling a singular story,” and he praised in particular the player’s sonic transparency. Playing files through the ATC’s USB input—streaming is not supported—Ken described the sound as “very good overall, including from DSD files, but it lacked the visceral grip of CDs through the ATC’s transport.” Reporting from his test bench, JA praised the CDA2 Mk2’s “generally superb measured performance, though its S/PDIF inputs aren’t up to the standard of jitter rejection offered by CD playback and the USB input.” (Vol.41 No.12 WWW)

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Audio Note CDT One/II: $4091 ★
At the core of the front-loading CDT One/II transport is a Philips L 1210/S mechanism, the stock logic board of which is supplemented with a second board, apparently designed and built by Audio Note. The 11.7″ W by 5.7″ H by 16.2″ D steel case contains a decidedly robust power supply, and a length of Audio Note’s AN-V silver interconnect carries the signal to the CDT One/II’s outputs: a choice of S/PDIF (RCA) or AES/EBU (XLR). The combination of this transport with Audio Note’s DAC 2.1x Signature D/A converter was praised by AD as comprising a CD player almost unrivaled in “the ability to involve me in the magic of notes and rhythms.” His conclusion: “Vigorously recommended.” JA noted that the Audio Note’s error correction “is better than that required by the CD standard, but is not as good as other current transports.” (Vol.39 No.1 WWW)

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Bryston BDP-3: $3995
In February 2017, Bryston upgraded their BDP-2 digital player to BDP-3 status, with refinements including an even faster Intel Quad-core processor; a Bryston-manufactured integrated audio device (IAD) in place of a soundcard; a custom Intel Celeron motherboard; a bigger power supply; and two additional USB ports, for a total of eight—three of which use the faster USB 3.0 protocol. Bryston’s tried-and-true player now supports up to 32/384 PCM and DSD128. The BDP-3 supports Tidal, and can be configured as a Roon endpoint. LG sent his BDP-2 to the Bryston factory for conversion to BDP-3 status (a $1500 upgrade) and found that the new media-player software displays more album art and metadata; more important, he found slight improvements in sound over the BDP-2, including improved bass extension and clearer, more open, more detailed presentations of well-recorded choral music. (Vol.41 No.1 WWW)

2019 High-End Audio Buyer’s Guide: DACs

Bryston BDA-3

The new Bryston BDA-3 enhances the functionality of the 2013 Product of the Year Award-winning BDA-2 by adding a second asynchronous USB input and four HDMI inputs. PCM sample rates up to 384kHz are now supported, as are DSD rates up to DSD256. Most significantly, not only can DSD signals be received by the BDA-3’s USB inputs, but also from suitably equipped HDMI sources. The evolutionary development of Bryston’s DACs from the original BDA-1 to the BDA-3 has been an object lesson in digital progress. Bryston’s BDA-3 DAC surpasses the high-value performance standard set by the BDA-2, enables inexpensive HDMI-equipped disc players to function as premium source components, and adds exceptionally engaging DSD playback to its potent mix of virtues.

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