Recommended Components: 2019 Edition
Disc Players, Transports & Media Players

A+

Merging Technologies Merging+Player Multichannel-8: $13,500
Noting the enthusiasm shown by “normal” audiophiles for proprietary music players that can be controlled by a tablet or smartphone, KR hailed the appearance of the surround-sound–friendly Merging+Player Multichannel-8 from the Swiss firm Merging Technologies, whose Merging+NADAC D/A converter so impressed him (see elsewhere in Recommended Components). Indeed, the Merging+Player is essentially that very DAC plus a player in the same box, said box now enhanced with a pair of USB inputs. The user is required to supply little more than speakers, amplifiers, and a subscription to Roon, which serves the Merging+Player as user interface. The Merging+Player can handle PCM up to 24/352.8 and DSD64, and has the processing power to do so with or without EQ—although KR mused that it could benefit from more horsepower, “if only to improve the user experience.” Still, KR found the standalone Merging+Player to sound no different from his reference Roon-equipped Baetis server—high praise. He described it as “a one-box system of the highest quality.” (Vol.41 No.3 WWW)

A

ATC CDA2 Mk2 CD player: $4249
An unexpected gem in the product line of a UK speaker specialist, the CDA2 Mk2 majors in the playing of “Red Book” CDs and minors in preamplification. As KM noted, “the beating heart of the revised CDA2 is twofold: a Chinese-made TEAC 5020A-AT CD transport . . . and [AKM’s] AK4490EQ DAC chip.” Preamp gain comes courtesy of op-amps built around discrete devices, and the USB receiver is an Amanero Combo 384. When using it to play CDs, KM found that “the ATC presented each as a character study of a unique sonic personality telling a singular story,” and he praised in particular the player’s sonic transparency. Playing files through the ATC’s USB input—streaming is not supported—Ken described the sound as “very good overall, including from DSD files, but it lacked the visceral grip of CDs through the ATC’s transport.” Reporting from his test bench, JA praised the CDA2 Mk2’s “generally superb measured performance, though its S/PDIF inputs aren’t up to the standard of jitter rejection offered by CD playback and the USB input.” (Vol.41 No.12 WWW)
  Audio Note CDT One/II: $4091 ★
At the core of the front-loading CDT One/II transport is a Philips L 1210/S mechanism, the stock logic board of which is supplemented with a second board, apparently designed and built by Audio Note. The 11.7″ W by 5.7″ H by 16.2″ D steel case contains a decidedly robust power supply, and a length of Audio Note’s AN-V silver interconnect carries the signal to the CDT One/II’s outputs: a choice of S/PDIF (RCA) or AES/EBU (XLR). The combination of this transport with Audio Note’s DAC 2.1x Signature D/A converter was praised by AD as comprising a CD player almost unrivaled in “the ability to involve me in the magic of notes and rhythms.” His conclusion: “Vigorously recommended.” JA noted that the Audio Note’s error correction “is better than that required by the CD standard, but is not as good as other current transports.” (Vol.39 No.1 WWW)
  Bryston BDP-3: $3995
In February 2017, Bryston upgraded their BDP-2 digital player to BDP-3 status, with refinements including an even faster Intel Quad-core processor; a Bryston-manufactured integrated audio device (IAD) in place of a soundcard; a custom Intel Celeron motherboard; a bigger power supply; and two additional USB ports, for a total of eight—three of which use the faster USB 3.0 protocol. Bryston’s tried-and-true player now supports up to 32/384 PCM and DSD128. The BDP-3 supports Tidal, and can be configured as a Roon endpoint. LG sent his BDP-2 to the Bryston factory for conversion to BDP-3 status (a $1500 upgrade) and found that the new media-player software displays more album art and metadata; more important, he found slight improvements in sound over the BDP-2, including improved bass extension and clearer, more open, more detailed presentations of well-recorded choral music. (Vol.41 No.1 WWW)
B
Bryston BCD-3: $3795
AD, whose preoccupation with obsolete technologies now extends to physical digital media, continues to seek out The Last CD Player You’ll Ever Buy, in which context he auditioned the Bryston BCD-3—a product that eschews both digital inputs and hi-rez media to focus on playback of “Red Book” CDs. (That said, the BCD-3 does have AES/EBU and S/PDIF digital-output jacks, for use with an outboard DAC.) The BCD-3 is built around the AKM AK4490 DAC chip—two per channel, in differential mode—and uses a metal-encased disc transport from the Austrian company StreamUnlimited, healthy supplies of which Bryston claims to already have on hand for future repairs. AD thoroughly enjoyed his time with the BCD-3, which did virtually everything he could have asked for: It played bluegrass music with drive and color, offered musically nuanced and pleasantly tactile playback of dense classical recordings, and even exposed the top-end glare heard on one disc as originating with his ancient Sony disc player, not the recording itself—which had “fine color and clarity” through the Bryston. AD concluded that the Bryston BCD-3 “offers very good value for the money. I could easily, happily live with it, and can just as easily recommend it.” JA’s measurements revealed nothing untoward—just “superb audio engineering.” (Vol.40 No.8 WWW)

Recommended Components: 2019 Edition
Digital Processors

A+
Bryston BDA-3: $3495
The first Bryston DAC to offer DSD compatibility, the BDA-3 supports the SACD format via its four HDMI inputs, and DSD128 to DSD256 via USB. (PCM performance, including user-selectable upsampling in multiples of 44.1 and 48kHz, extends to 384kHz; DoP is also supported.) Twin AKM DAC chips are used, as are completely separate paths for PCM and DSD data. Using an Oppo BDP-103 universal BD player to listen to SACDs through the Bryston BDA-3, LG remarked that “spatial performance was sensational, with wider, deeper soundstages than heard from my SACD player on its own,” and praised the Bryston’s overall performance for delivering “superbly effortless, delicate, subtly revealing, tube-like analog output from a variety of digital file formats and sample rates.” Writing from his test bench, JA singled out for praise the BDA-3’s extremely low levels of noise and distortion and “superb” resolution—close to 21 bits—and concluded that it “offers measured performance that is as good as digital can get.” Remote control adds $250. (Vol.39 No.12 WWW)
A                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                     
Audio Note DAC 2.1x Signature: $5475 ★
In common with other Audio Note D/A converters and CD players, the DAC 2.1x Signature is built around a rather old-school 18-bit Analog Devices 1865 chip, said to be hand selected. Neither oversampling nor digital filtering is used, nor does the DAC 2.1x Signature contain an analog filter; according to Audio Note, the converter’s use of a transformer as an I/V stage confers on the output signal sufficient treble rolloff. The tubed output stage is built with Audio Note’s own copper-foil-in-oil signal capacitors, and signal output is handled by Audio Note Silver interconnect cable. Digital inputs are limited to S/PDIF (RCA) and AES/EBU (XLR); a USB input is not offered. After using it with Audio Note’s own CDT One/II disc transport, AD praised the DAC 2.1x Signature for its sonic heft and substance, its analog-like momentum and flow, and, overall, a knack for “bringing out the goodness of good recordings, [although it] also had a knack for accentuating the badness of certain types of bad recordings.” While testing the DAC 2.1x Signature, JA discovered distortion products, noise, jitter, and data truncation (24 to 18 bits), leading him to describe the Audio Note as “broken.” (Vol.39 No.1 WWW)

Recommended Components: 2019 Edition
Surround-Sound Components

A+

Merging Technologies NADAC Multichannel-8: $11,500
Among pro-audio companies that have set their sights on the domestic market, the Swiss manufacturer Merging Technologies is noted for its experience with high-resolution networked-audio interfaces. Their NADAC Multichannel-8 (its first name stands for Network Attached Digital to Analogue Converter) is intended for use with network-based file players, and is compatible with the audio-specific Ravenna protocol. Via Ethernet, the Multichannel-8 supports PCM up to 384kHz, plus DXD and DSD256; S/PDIF and AES/EBU inputs are also supplied, and these are compatible with up to 192kHz, and DSD over PCM (DoP). In KR’s system, physical hookup went smoothly, and although there was a hitch or two in setup, the effort was rewarded: “Even admitting to a positive expectation bias, I was impressed with the sound, not disappointed.” KR observed that, while listening to a multichannel DSD256 file, “I had the disturbing but exhilarating feeling that music was actually being made in my room, not merely reproduced. The sound was no more ‘multichannel’ than it was ‘stereo.'” Speaking of which, a stereo-only version of the Multichannel-8, the NADAC Stereo, is available for $10,500. (Vol.39 Nos.3 & 5 WWW)

A

Bryston 9B-SST2: $10,995 ★
The 9B-SST2 power amplifier (called 9B-THX at the time of the review) boasts five channels, 120Wpc into 8 ohms, and is built like pro gear; ie, like a tank. Hand-soldered, double-sided glass-epoxy boards and elaborate grounding scheme front special-grade steel toroidal transformers. According to JA, “the excellent set of measurements indicates solid, reliable engineering.” LG was impressed by this amp’s speed, power, extension, its tightness and definition in the bass, and its “excellent” midrange. Fully the equal of more costly amps, with wide dynamic contrasts and “involving” vocals, and sonically similar to previous Bryston ST amps. THX conformance, a 20-year (!) warranty, and a reasonable price make this beefy, reliable amp an attractive package—a perfect choice, suggests LG, for home-theater and multichannel music systems. KR’s long-term multi-channel reference. (Vol.23 No.9 WWW)

Recommended Components: 2019 Edition
Preamplifiers

Two-Channel Preamplifiers
A

Bryston BP173: $4495 $$$
With its five single-ended inputs, two balanced inputs, and mix of single-ended and balanced outputs, the solid-state BP-173 is the middle model of Bryston’s three line-level preamplifiers. That said, the base BP-173 can be customized with a variety of add-ons, including a MM phono stage ($750), a DAC ($750), and a remote-control handset ($375). Used in tandem with a Mark Levinson No.534 power amp (see “Power Amplifiers”), a fully equipped BP-173 delighted LG with its ability to preserve bass weight and solidity when called for, and its no less impressive re-creation of recording-hall ambience. Overall, according to LG, the Bryston “produced engaging, detailed, tonally captivating, utterly natural sound that approached reference quality.” JA’s report from his lab on the “superbly well engineered” Bryston was similarly to the point: “It is difficult to see how a preamplifier could perform any better on the test bench!” (Vol.41 No.6 WWW)

Recommended Components: 2019 Edition
Subwoofers

Subwoofers & Crossovers
B
Bryston 10B-SUB crossover: $5295 ★
The 10B features three balanced configurations—stereo two-way, monophonic two-way, and monophonic three-way—and proved extraordinarily versatile in managing crossover slopes and frequencies. LG heard no electronic edginess and noted only the slightest loss in soundstage depth. “I found the 10B-SUB’s sound clear, transparent, and neutral—as good as I’ve ever heard from an outboard crossover.” (Vol.18 No.5, Vol.28 No.11 WWW)




%d bloggers like this: